The growth of chip-enhanced credit card use continues, even as the majority of merchants still haven't utilized these systems over the past few months. While it's just one example of trends within Point of Sale system users, it does show a possible gap between the cards consumers are using and the terminals available to them, as well as a disconnect between merchants and banks.

A survey from the Strawhecker Group recently identified some of the expectations surrounding further EMV adoption as the technology grows. The source does say that 50 percent of merchants will likely allow EMV use by this June. However, the current figures are less optimistic: a mere 37 percent of retail businesses are thought to use this system, more than 3 percent less than a previous survey found.

USA Today spoke to Jason Brewer, representative of the Retail Industry Leaders Association, who cited the challenges many retailers still face as they try to accept more and more of these cards.

"Retailers remain frustrated that the investments they have made in new terminals is not being met with a similar investment by banks and credit unions in chip and pin technology," Brewer said. "The chip and signature cards American consumers are receiving to replace old swipe cards are still less secure than the cards issued in Europe, Canada and the rest of the industrialized world." Brewer also said that more than 212 million chip cards are in use in the United States, representing growth even as EMV lags behind some expectations.

Credit card payment processor conversion is a gradual process that can challenge merchants who haven't done their research. Accepting the latest credit cards could play a role in how the merchant reacts to important payment standards. Visit our website to learn more about our software.