Modernizing credit card-based payment systems doesn't mean that merchants are ready to move away from plastic just yet. The best solution for the immediate future could be one that involves up-to-date software that still accepts standard stripe and chip-based cards. At the same time, the stories of large-scale breaches can have brick and mortar stores on their toes.

Although the Target breach is now multiple years old, it still stands as a warning event for those worried about credit card data security. Statistics are still surfacing related to this breach, with TechCrunch reporting on the overall impact of the fraud.

According to this source, the retail chain lost more than 160 million in expenses after the breach. In addition, the company faces the possible legal fallout of impending lawsuits from the shoppers whose information was compromised. Another crucial factor mentioned by the source is the amount of time it took (nearly two weeks) for the store to discover the problem. 

The persistence of physical credit card use means businesses have to still look closely at ways card data might get stolen within the organization. As they look for new credit card payment software, businesses should also remember the need for employee vigilance, as this BankRate article notes.

It lists several possible ways in which POS situations can lead to insider credit card theft. In restaurants and gas stations, employees may walk away with a patron's card and start copying it within seconds.

Updating the payment card processors your business relies on could be the first step in a drive towards better compliance. Even if the signs of a future of digital payment seem enticing, addressing the issues affecting current card use can be more effective in the short term.