As companies become increasingly knowledgeable about credit card security threats and how to stop them, hackers are looking towards other ways of stealing credit card information. One new way is through text messaging.

Card holders receive a message, often at night, claiming to be from the bank saying that their credit card has been de-activated. The message then give people reply options, such as a number to call or response instructions via text message. These typically require the customer to confirm their card number, expiration date and the three-digit security code on the back of the card. Through the claim to need this information to verify the card and re-activate it, they're actually just stealing the information. 

The rule of thumb in a situation like this is to never trust an unsolicited text message. The U.S. government bans most of these kinds of messages, as they require users to opt-in these services. While some banks do provide text alerts, they all require you to sign up before receiving them. If you get one of these messages, call the number on the back of your credit card right away and report it to your bank. 

While some marketing text messaging services can be canceled by replying "STOP" or "NO," never reply to one of these messages, even if it's one of these cancelling options. In many cases, hackers use an automated system that randomly generates numbers and messages them. The only thing your response will do is alert them that the your number is valid, and future attempts may increase. Likewise, never call the number sending the message either.

One thing you can do is forward the message to 7726, or "SPAM" on most keypads. This will alert your wireless carrier, who can then block texts from that number in the future. 

If you are in need of new credit card payment software for your business, be sure to contact 911 Software. Our website is a great way to learn all about the different high-quality products that we offer.