This blog has covered a string of recent developments within the credit card industry that could be of significant interest to merchants on both the business and consumer side of the spectrum. The American Bankers Association has published a report stating that the rate of card payments overdue by more than 30 days has dropped to a significantly low percentage. If rates like this continue in this direction, it's possible that regular use of card payments could become more frequent, as consumers have a more solid foundation to base their shopping decisions on.

As CNN reported, the delinquency rate has reached 2.47 percent, which marks the lowest it's hit in almost a decade. It's a massive improvement over the rate of just four years ago, which was slightly above 5 percent and still the highest on record. While loan payments in some areas are also being made more regularly, the effect is not visible across the board. Some student loan delinquencies, for example, are over ten percent. 

Despite this, Credit Union Times quoted James Chessen, chief economist of the ABA, as being optimistic about the future, even with much work still to be done.

"The sharp decline in delinquencies reinforces the notion that the economic recovery has become more self-sustaining and is on a path to increased growth," he said.

Users of credit card processors can take this information as a cautious bit of good news, as a stronger card industry could lead to better spender confidence and more instances of responsible payments. Establishments that employ POS payment processing may not get to know the intimate purchasing history of every customer, but those habits have an impact, and it's possible this latest statistic could represent a positive pattern leading to more relief for businesses.