At a tech conference last week, Amazon officials announced that the company would be extending its services to offer cloud computing processes to customers. This will put Amazon in competition with businesses like IBM and Google.

The Synergy Research Group recently announced that Amazon's web-based services unit boasts about a 27 percent share of the worldwide market for cloud infrastructure, with Microsoft coming in second with 10 percent.

Johnson & Johnson, Intuit and General Electric are some of Amazon's cloud-computing customers, and the company announced that the amount of data Amazon stores has grown by 137 percent over the past year alone. Tech experts project that the numbers will only continue to grow.

"Two years ago, public clouds were maybe 2 percent of all computing workloads," said a senior analyst at Gartner, Lydia Leong, to the New York Times. "Now they are more than 10 percent. By 2018, it will be more than 50 percent."

In addition to being cost-effective, the officials at Amazon Web Services argue that cloud-based technology allows companies to detect customer needs with greater immediacy. Businesses can look at their data and see exactly what small changes can and should be made to better serve the consumers. This allows companies to evolve more quickly and keep up with competitors.

"The cloud is cheaper, but that isn't really what is driving companies into it," said Google executive Greg Michillie. "They want to be more experimental, faster, data driven. This is part of a larger change inside companies."

Cloud-based data storage is quickly becoming the new normal as companies discover the range of adaptability it offers. If your company isn't operating on a cloud-based network, consider upgrading your credit card processing software as we near the holiday season. The cloud allows you to keep your data safe and accessible for less financial output.